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Holy Trinity Orthodox Seminary is offering a four-year, on-campus Bachelor of Theology degree as of the fall of 2016. The original five-year B.Th. program has been condensed without eliminating any subjects. 

The Bachelor of Theology (HEGIS 2301) is the standard, degree-seeking program offered at Holy Trinity Orthodox Seminary.  This program lays a strong foundation for the study of theology by incorporating both basic courses in humanities and theological disciplines.  The B.Th. program intends to prepare candidates for ordination by providing students with theological, liturgical, and pastoral training.  Likewise, the program is intended to prepare choir directors and lay leaders for the service of the Orthodox Church.

All classes are taught in English. 

Program Objectives: Holy Trinity Seminary identifies the following program objectives or learning outcomes, seeking to equip its B.Th. students, upon graduation, to be able to:

  • Read and interpret Holy Scriptures in the light of the Orthodox, patristic tradition in order to proclaim the Gospel with knowledge and understanding;

  • Possess a broad knowledge of Orthodox Christian theology, history, and pastoral disciplines and learn to apply this learning in pastoral work;

  • Acquire and develop an understanding of history, literature, philosophy, other humanities and cultural context through the theological perspective of the Orthodox Christian teaching;

  • Have a thorough practical and theoretical knowledge of liturgical services of the Orthodox Church, and be able to celebrate them “decently and in order” (1 Cor 14:40) in accordance with the Orthodox tradition;   

  • Have sufficient competence in Russian and Church Slavonic languages in order to be able to serve the bilingual communities of the Russian Church Abroad.

Degree Requirements:  The degree of Bachelor of Theology is awarded annually at the close of the spring semester at the recommendation of the Faculty Council.  The degree will be awarded upon the completion of the degree requirements which include:

1. Successful completion of a minimum of 120 credit hours in coursework and of all required courses with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 (C);

2. Successful completion of the B.Th. comprehensive examination;

3. Successful submission of a B.Th. thesis (see below);

4. Completion of the field education (practicum) component of the B.Th. curriculum;

5. A satisfactory record of attendance at church services, as shown in the grade for Practical Liturgics.

Comprehensive Examinations: In the spring semester of their final year of studies, all B.Th. students must pass a comprehensive examination, comprising both written and oral components.  The comprehensive examination is meant to assess a student’s knowledge of theological disciplines and practical liturgics, and his ability to use this knowledge in pastoral situations. Successful completion of the comprehensive examination is required for graduation from the Seminary.

Thesis: In their final year of studies all B.Th. students are required to complete a B.Th. Thesis, no less than 30 pages in length.  A B.Th. Thesis normally constitutes an extended research paper on one of the questions of Orthodox theology, church history, liturgics or pastoral practice.  The topic of the Thesis is determined by the agreement between a student and his chosen thesis advisor.  The thesis topic should be clearly indicated on the Thesis Approval Form, submitted to the Office of the Dean and bearing the signatures of the thesis advisor and of the Dean of the Seminary.  The student should be working on his thesis under the direction of his thesis advisor, adhering to the deadlines and the Seminary’s policies concerning the completion of the thesis.  The final copy of the thesis must conform to the Thesis Stylesheet approved by the Dean.

Two hard bound copies of the final version of the B.Th. Thesis must be submitted to the Office of the Dean no later than the last day of classes for the spring semester. The copies of the thesis shall be distributed to the thesis advisor and the second reader who will read the thesis and issue their grades.  The student’s thesis grade will be recorded in his transcript.    

A note about Russian Language:  Russian Language education remains an integral part of HTOS' theological and pastoral education, and students are required to complete three years of Russian lanuage studies.  These courses assume no prior knowledge of Russian. 

For information about the application process and tuition and fees for the Bachelor of Theology Degree program, please visit our admissions page located at here: http://hts.edu/admissions.html.

At the discretion of the administration, a student may be allowed to complete up to sixty credits in self-study status, and not more than half of the credits required for graduation.  However, on account of the fact that the final-year courses are the most critical to a seminary education, the final year of seminary may not be completed in self-study status. 

Please find below a list of the courses offered for the Bachelor of Theology degree. 

First Year

FALL  (5 courses)                                                      SPRING  (5 courses)

 

RUS 101    First Year Russian      RUS 102    First Year Russian

MUSIC 111  Church Music            MUSIC 112  Church Music         

CS 105     Church Slavonic         CS 205     Church Slavonic

THEO 149   Foundations Theo.       THEO 162   Foundations Theo.

ENG 107    English                 HIST 122   Russian History

 

Second Year

FALL  (5 courses)                                                      SPRING  (6 courses)

 

RUS 201    Second Year Russian     RUS 202    Second Year Russian

CS 206     Church Slavonic         BIBLE 220  Biblical Archaeology

LITURG 241 Liturgics               LITURG 242 Liturgics 

HIST 213   World History           PHILO 266  History of Philosophy

HIST 225   Russian Church Hist.    RUS 216    Russian Literature

                                   HIST 226   Russian Church Hist. 

 

Third Year

FALL  (5 courses)                                                      SPRING  (5 courses)

 

RUS 301    Third Year Russian      RUS 302    Third Year Russian

PHILO 365  Byzantine Philosophy    THEO 352   Dogmatic Theo.

BIBLE 331  Old Testament           BIBLE 332  Old Testament

BIBLE 333  New Testament           BIBLE 334  New Testament

GREEK 311  Bibl. & Lit. Greek      GREEK 312  Bibl. & Lit. Greek

 

Fourth Year

FALL  (6 courses)                                                      SPRING  (5 courses)

 

THEO 453   Pastoral Theo.          THEO 454   Pastoral Theo.

HIST 419   Church History          HIST 420   Church History

THEO 443   Liturgical Theo.        THEO 456   Moral Theology

PATR 435   Patrology               THEO 425   Canon Law

THEO 448   Comparative Theo.       THEO 418   Homiletics

THEO 417   Homiletics              Thesis

Field Ed. Requirement              Field Ed. Requirement

Russian 101-102

Credits: 3 credits/semester

Dr Elena Nelson

Russian 101-102 function as a comprehensive program for the study of Russian language and culture.  The course focuses on proficiency in the following skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing, as well as on the building blocks of grammar and vocabulary.  The course is taught with a communicative, process-oriented approach in compliance with ACTFL’s Oral Proficiency Guidelines and the 5C’s of the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning.

 

Church Slavonic 105-106

Credits: 3 credits/semester

The Rev. Protodeacon Victor Lochmatow/Dr Elena Nelson

The course introduces students to Church Slavonic alphabet and numerical system. Upon the development of initial vocabulary, the students are engaged in intensive practice in reading with reference to English translations to develop comprehension.

 

English 107  

Credits: 4 credits

Mr Edward F. Novis

English Composition and Literature.  This is a first-year college-level English course that integrates literature and composition.  The course includes a survey of English literature which the students access through close reading and analysis of a selection of representative texts.  The students will also be taught different modes of writing, with special emphasis on developing a thesis and on formal rules of English grammar.

 

Church Music 111

Credits: 3 credits

Mr Nicholas Kotar/Staff

The course introduces students to the basics of Orthodox ecclesiastical musicianship, focusing on the memorization of the eight tones and basic principles of voice production.

 

Church Music 112

Credits: 3 credits

Mr Nicholas Kotar/Staff

The course is an introduction to the advanced level of Orthodox Christian musicianship.  The course introduces the students to the principles of church choir conducting, square notation, and special melodies (podobny).  The course also includes the survey of the history of sacred music with emphasis on style and practice of t he Russian Church.

Prerequisite: Church Music 111.

 

Russian History 122

Credits: 4 credits

The Rev. Deacon Andrei Psarev

This course offers a survey of the history of Russia from the beginning of the Russian state to the modern period.  The course specifically focuses on the period of the Tatar yoke, Time of Troubles, the development of the Muscovite state, and the reforms of Peter the Great.  The course concludes with the analysis of the Revolution of 1917, the Civil War, and the impact of the Revolution on the Russian people and culture, including the Russian diaspora.

 

Foundations of Theology 149

Credits:  4 credits

The Rev. John Malcom

The course offers an introduction to the principles of Orthodox theology and spiritual life for the first-year students.  The course includes the survey of the Scriptures, sacred history, basic catechism, structure and content of the divine services, and the foundations of spirituality.

 

Foundations of Theology 162

Credits:  4 credits

Dr. Vitaly Permiakov

Orthodox Apologetics. The course explores the defense of fundamental teachings of the Orthodox faith in response to challenges from heterodox traditions, modern atheism and secularism. The course also explores the general principles of religious studies, including the substance of religion, existence of God, immortality of the soul, and the teaching on revelation.

Prerequisite: Foundations of Theology 149.

 

Church Slavonic 205

Credits: 3 credits

Dr Elena Nelson

This is a practical course that trains students to articulate and understand Church Slavonic liturgical texts.  Students learn vocabulary items and master fundamental grammar topics in the context of authentic liturgical texts. Special attention is given to festal troparia and Gospel readings, which are often presented in an order that corresponds to the Orthodox liturgical calendar.  Students also memorize basic Church Slavonic prayers.

Prerequisite: Church Slavonic 105-106.

 

English as Second Language 207E, 208E, 307E, 308E

Ms Lauren Jedlan

This remedial course covers English vocabulary, conversation, writing, and grammar, and is designed for the students who are not native English speakers, who have passed the TOEFL with a score of  76 or higher but are not yet prepared to take English 107.

Second Year

Russian 201-202

Credits:  3 credits

Dr Elena Nelson

Russian 201 and 202 follow from 101/102 in continuing to develop proficiency in the following skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing, as well as on the building blocks of grammar and vocabulary.  Russian 201/201, taught primarily in Russian, function as a comprehensive program for the study of Russian language and culture.  The course is taught with a communicative, process-oriented approach in compliance with ACTFL’s Oral Proficiency Guidelines and the 5C’s of the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning.

Prerequisite:  Russian 101-102.

 

Church Slavonic 206

Credits: 3 credits

Dr Elena Nelson

This is a practical course that trains students to articulate and understand Church Slavonic liturgical texts.  Students learn vocabulary items and master fundamental grammar topics in the context of authentic liturgical texts. Special attention is given to festal troparia and Gospel readings, which are often presented in an order that corresponds to the Orthodox liturgical calendar.  Students also memorize basic Church Slavonic prayers.

Prerequisite: Church Slavonic 205.

 

World History and Civilization 213

Credits: 4 credits

The Rev. Deacon Andrei Psarev

The course offers a survey of ancient and medieval history, with emphasis on the pivotal events, processes and attitudes in Byzantium from 313 to 1453, including discussions of philosophy, Church art and literature. This course provides a foundation for the study of Church History by focusing on socio-political events in the history of Eastern Roman Empire.

 

Russian Literature 216

Credits:  4 credits

The Rev. Protodeacon Victor Lochmatow

The course is an introductory survey of Russian literature, both ecclesiastical and secular, from the baptism of Russia to the “Golden Age” classical Russian authors.  Specific focus is made on the 18th-19th century writers and major literary trends of this period.  The classical Russian writers and poets are given special attention, including Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy.

 

Russian Church History 225

Credits: 3 credits

The Rev. Deacon Andrei Psarev

Russian Church History I.  This course is a survey of the history of the Russian Church from the baptism of Rus until the Old Believer Schism of the 17th century.  The primary sources on the Russian church history are studied, and specific turning points are discussed, including the church under the Kievan State and the Tatar Yoke, the establishment of the Moscow Patriarchate, and the reforms of Patriarch Nikon.

Prerequisite:  Russian History 122.

 

Russian Church History 226

Credits:  3 credits

The Rev. Deacon Andrei Psarev

Russian Church History II.  The course offers a survey of the history of the Russian Church from the beginning of the Synodal period until the modern period.  The status of the Russian church from Peter the Great until the Revolution of 1917 is given detailed attention.  The latter part of the course offers an in-depth study of the major turning points in the history of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia.

Prerequisite: Russian Church History 225.

 

Biblical Archeology 220

Credits: 2 credits

The Very Rev. Hegumen Theophylact

The goal of the course is to familiarize the students with the history and culture of the Biblical world, to enhance their understanding of the Old and New Testaments and of the meaning of the Holy Scriptures.

 

Liturgics 241

Credits: 4 credits

The Rev. Deacon Peter Markevich

The course offers an introduction to the structure, organization, and celebration of the liturgical services of the Orthodox Church.  The course overviews the structure of liturgical year, as well as the development and the received form of Matins, Vespers, Hours, and All-Night Vigil.

 

Liturgics 242

Credits:  4 credits

The Rev. Deacon Peter Markevich

The course offers an introduction to the structure, organization, and celebration of the services of the Orthodox Church, specifically focusing on the  divine liturgies of St John Chrysostom, St Basil the Great, and of the Presanctified Gifts. The services of the Lenten and Paschal cycle are also studied, as well as the celebration of other sacraments and rites described in the Book of Needs.

Prerequisite: Liturgics 241.

 

Philosophy 266

Credits:  2 credits

Mr Edward F. Novis

History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy.  This course offers an historical overview of most important philosophical themes in the work of the prominent Greco-Roman, Byzantine, and Roman Catholic philosophers.  Topics include the study of humanity, the cosmos, divinity, and the relationship between them (e.g. human individuality, origin of cosmos, participation in the divine, etc.).

Third Year

Russian 301-302

Credits: 3 credits/semester

Dr Elena Nelson

Russian III. Conducted primarily in Russian, this course focuses on discussion, reading, vocabulary acquisition, and grammar review. The course is taught with a communicative, process-oriented approach in compliance with ACTFL’s Oral Proficiency Guidelines and the 5C’s of the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning.

Prerequisite:  Russian 101-102, Russian 201-202.

 

Biblical and Liturgical Greek 311

Credits:  3 credits

The Very Rev. Hegumen Cyprian

Introduction to Biblical and Liturgical Greek grammar and vocabulary, with emphasis on translation and exegesis. Texts include excerpts from Gospels, Acts and Epistles, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms, and Prophecies as well as the Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom and other material from the Divine Services. 

 

Biblical and Liturgical Greek 312

Credits: 3 credits

The Very Rev. Hegumen Cyprian

Biblical and Liturgical Greek II. Introduction to Biblical and Liturgical Greek grammar and vocabulary, with emphasis on translation and exegesis. Texts include excerpts from Gospels, Acts and Epistles, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms, and Prophecies as well as the Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom and other material from the Divine Services.

Prerequisite: Biblical and Liturgical Greek 311.

 

Old Testament 331

Credits: 4 credits

The Very Rev. Archpriest Peter A. Heers

Pentateuch and Historical Books. The course introduces students to the books of the Scriptures of the Old Testament, focusing specifically on the structure, history, content, composition, and patristic exegesis of the Pentateuch (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy) and the historical books of the Bible.

 

Old Testament 332

Credits: 4 credits

The Very Rev. Archpriest Peter A. Heers

Prophets and Writings.  The course introduces students to the books of the Scriptures of the Old Testament, focusing specifically on the structure, history, content, composition, and patristic interpretation of the Psalms, ethical books (Proverbs, Wisdom of Solomon, etc.), and the books of the Prophets.  The messianic theme in the Prophets (esp. Isaiah) and the liturgical use of the Old Testament Scriptures are given special attention.

Prerequisite: Old Testament 331.

 

New Testament 333

Credits: 4 credits

The Very Rev. Archpriest Peter A. Heers

Gospels and Acts of the Apostles.  The course introduces the students into the study of the canonical Gospels and the Acts of the Apostles, particularly focusing on the role and the reception of the Gospels in the liturgical, theological, and spiritual life of the Church.  The course studies historical, literary, and theological aspects of the individual books of the New Testament, showing the relationships between the texts in presenting together the unique theological vision of the Person of our Lord Jesus Christ.

 

New Testament 334

Credits: 4 credits

The Very Rev. Archpriest Peter A. Heers

Epistles and Revelation. The course introduces the students into the study of the Epistles of St Paul, General Epistles, and the Revelation (Apocalypse) of St John, particularly focusing on the role and the reception of these writings in the liturgical, theological, and spiritual life of the Church.  The course studies historical, literary, and theological aspects of the individual books of the New Testament.

Prerequisite: New Testament 333.

 

Dogmatic Theology 352

Credits:  4 credits

Dr Vitaly Permiakov

This course is the introduction to the system of dogmatic theology of the Orthodox Church.  The course will focus on the exposition of the Orthodox doctrine concerning Scripture and tradition, the knowledge of God,  Trinitarian theology, Christology, and ecclesiology.  The goal of the course is to acquaint the students with the richness and depth of the Orthodox theological thought, enabling them to proclaim their faith with knowledge and understanding.

 

Philosophy 365

Credits:  2 credits

Mr Edward F. Novis

Byzantine Philosophy.  The course introduces  students to a basic philosophical apparatus necessary to understand Byzantine theology and culture.  The course thoroughly studies the philosophical works of Nemesius of Emesa (c. 390) and St John of Damascus (d. 749), supplementing those works with the works of other Church Fathers who utilized the Byzantine philosophical framework.    

Prerequisite: Philosophy 266.

Fourth Year

Homiletics 417-418

Credits:  1 credit

The Very Rev. Archpriest Gregory Naumenko

This two-semester course, supplemental to Pastoral Theology 453-454, introduces the students to the theoretical aspects and the technique of Orthodox Christian preaching.  The course includes the study of different forms of sermons, as well as hallmarks of Orthodox patristic oratory.

 

Church History 419

Credits:  3 credits

The Rev. John Malcom

Early Christianity and Byzantine Church.  The course traces the development of the Church from the New Testament period until the end of the Byzantine period (1453).  The study focuses on the history and theology of the seven Ecumenical Councils and the Schism of 1054. The establishment and historical role of the Patriarchate of Constantinople is also addressed in this course.

 

Church History 420

Credits:  3 credits

The Rev. John Malcom

Orthodox Church in the Modern Period. The course examines the history and development of Orthodox churches after the fall of Byzantium in 1453 until the modern times.  The course explores the relations between the Church and state, struggle against Papal expansion, and the response of Orthodoxy to the challenges of the Reformation.

Prerequisite: Church History 419.

 

Canon Law 425

Credits:  4 credits

The Rev. Deacon Andrei Psarev

The course introduces the students to the fundamentals of Orthodox canon law, with a focused discussion of the canonical sources concerning Orthodox ecclesiology, the sacrament of marriage, and the ecclesiastical court.

 

Patrology 435

Credits:  4 credits

The Very Rev. Protopresbyter George D. Dragas

Early and Byzantine Fathers.  Study of Apostolic Fathers. Apologists. Major Fathers of the fourth century: their works, biography, teachings, and influence.  Study of ascetical writers. Rise of monasticism. Fathers of the Byzantine period. Late Byzantine and Russian fathers up to the present day.

 

 

Liturgical Theology 443

Credits:  4 credits

Dr Vitaly Permiakov

This course interprets “liturgical theology” as the study of historical and theological meaning of liturgical rites, achieved through the close reading of patristic and liturgical sources.  The course focuses on the reading and discussion of primary and secondary texts, illuminating the early history and formation of the Orthodox Christian liturgy in the Byzantine tradition.  

Prerequisite:  Liturgics 241-242.

 

Comparative Theology 448

Credits:  4 credits

The Very Rev. Archpriest Alexander F. C. Webster

The course offers a comparative survey of major religious denominations, focusing on their historical origins and basic theological principles.  In particular, the course studies the origins and doctrinal tenets of Non-Chalcedonian Christianity, Roman Catholicism, and most important branches of Protestantism.  The course also introduces students to major non-Christian religions: Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism.

 

Pastoral Theology 453

Credits:  3 credits

The Very Rev. Archpriest Gregory Naumenko

The course acquaints the students with the traditional teaching of the Orthodox Church concerning pastorship, especially focusing on the ideal of the pastor as presented in the Scriptures and Fathers, and duties and problems of pastoral ministry.  Relationship between pastor and parish are thoroughly examined.

 

Pastoral Theology 454

Credits:  3 credits

The Very Rev. Archpriest Gregory Naumenko

The course, continuing further the exploration of the themes of Pastoral Theology 453, seeks to teach the students theological perspective and practical skills to equip them for their future pastoral ministry in a parish.

Prerequisite: Pastoral Theology 453.

 

Moral Theology 456

Credits:  4 credits

The Very Rev. Archpriest Alexander F. C. Webster

This course is an examination of the dogmatic principles of moral theology from the perspective of the teaching of the Church Fathers.  The concepts of moral law, virtue, sin, Christian relationship with self, family, neighbour, and the state are explored from the patristic and ecclesiological point of view.

 

 

 

Program

 

Bachelor of Theology

Certificate in Pastoral Studies

Certificate of Theological Studies

Tuition 2018-19

$3750/Semester

$3750/Semester

$150/Credit

Tuition 2019-20

$3875/Semester

$3875/semester

$150/Credit

Undergraduate Dormitory Room and Board 2018-19, with work-study

$1575/semester

$1575/semester

n/a

Undergraduate

Dormitory Room and Board 2018-2019 without work-study

$2645/semester

$2645/semester

n/a

Books and supplies

$200/semester

$200/semester

$150/semester

Online Exam Fees

n/a

n/a

$20/exam

 

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Holy Trinity Orthodox Seminary
PO Box 36
Jordanville, N. Y. 13361
Telephone: (315) 858-0945
info@hts.edu